Tag Archives: Salt Water Fishing

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE SALT

The Orvis Guide To Saltwater Fly Fishing by Nick Curcione

The Orvis Guide To Saltwater Fly Fishing: A Thorough and Practical Guide to All Aspects of Fly Fishing in Salt Water – Flats, Surf, Inshore, and Bluewater by Nick Curcione.

Memories of The Giant Sea Bass, The King of The Kelp Forest

A Fishermans Catch of Giant Sea Bass By The Office Meteor Boat Company Off Catalina Island, California
The Good Old Days Never Looked So Go

 

October 7, 2015

Did you know that you may be a deltiologist?  Would your next question be, just what in the heck is that?

As it turns out, I may be one too, and I had thought that I just liked many of the images which can be found on old postcards.

Deltiology is the study and collection of postcards, and of course a deltiologist is one who collects. If you do, you are far from being alone. It is the third largest collecting hobby after stamp and coin collecting.

How about that?

I am particularly drawn to images relating to natural history and wildlife, and even more so to vintage hunting and fishing scenes.

My collection is not that big, and I don’t know all that much about the collecting field in itself. My only real motive to this point is that I bought them because I like them. I suspect that some of the images are rare. No doubt, some are not. Most are completely fascinating, at least to me.

I do know that picture postcards fall into categories based on the time period produced and published. The years 1898 to 1919 are considered to be the Golden Age of Postcards, followed by Linen Postcards (1930-1950), and the Modern Chromes (after 1940). There are further differentiations within these categories.

I found this particular postcard in a second-hand store, and I was astounded at the sheer size of the fish. My first reaction was to wonder – were they real?

Well, of course they are, and it is not an optical illusion. Photoshop and other photo manipulation programs had yet to be imagined.

But what about these magnificent fish? Could the largest of them depicted here really have weighed in at 320 pounds?

The postcard simply states “A Catch of Black Sea Bass”, and that would appear to be quite an understatement for fish of this size.  It is a species that until this time I was completely unfamiliar with, and that in itself was a big surprise. But then again, I was born and raised on the East Coast, and they are found primarily off of the coast of California, and south into Mexico.

Obviously, they would not be an easy fish to miss, though their true name is the Giant (Black) Sea Bass. To this day very little is know about their biology and habits. They may be capable of reaching lengths of up to seven or eight feet, and one specimen was reported to have weighed nearly 800 pounds. Now that’s a fish that can really get your attention, which sometimes is not such a good thing.

By 1915 both commercial and sport fisherman had taken their toll on the population. By 1935 most commercial fishing was no longer viable, and by the 1970’s they had all but disappeared. Finally, in 1981 the state of California closed all fishing for the Giant Sea Bass, although no official conservation status has ever been designated.

Postcards can be difficult to date. This one was easy, since the postmark tells us that it was posted in 1909. And we know that the charter was by the Office Meteor Boat Company, which was an established company on Catalina Island at the time. One must wonder if the participants ever had an idea that the best sport fishing years were nearly at an end?

No one knows yet if the king of the kelp forest  will ever make a full recovery, but from what I can gather there is still hope. Until then, we may have to be content with known historical reports and the photographic record, such as it is.

And that’s another great reason to collect postcards…

Posted by Michael Patrick McCarty

Read More About The Giant Sea Bass Here

https://steemit.com/fishing/@huntbook/memories-of-the-giant-sea-bass-the-king-of-the-kelp-forest

It’s About Time – To Go Fishing!

Fin Strike PFK0440PLF Pro-Series Fluke Rig (Misc.)

The Fin Strike Pro Series Fluke Rig features an upgraded hook and hardware from the standard Fin Strike Fluke Rigs. The PFK0440WHF series feature a super sharp 4/0 Black Gamakatsu Shiner Hook with a Pearl Flash Teaser and a spinner blade for maximum fish attraction. The PFK0440WHF also features Fluorocarbon Leader plus oval beads and a sinker pin snap. With Fin Strike Pro Series Rigs you are assured a higher hook up rate and the super strong Gamakatsu Hook will not let even the largest catch loose.

1 complete rig per pack.


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Summer Was Made for Fluke and The Jersey Shore

For me, the long, humid, and hazy days of summer still bring back memories of mostly one thing – and that would be of bottom fishing for flounder on a long drift somewhere off of a New Jersey beach.

I’ve been a long time gone from that particular part of the world, and perhaps there are better places to be on a summer vacation. Then again, perhaps not. We all have our favorite places to rest and relax, and I’ve developed more than a few top contenders over the years.

But New Jersey is where I grew up, and fishing for fluke and bluefish in the summer is what we did. It’s always good to return to your roots and a familiar kind of fun. Fishing is finer with family, too.

So, I say again, summer was made for fluke and the New Jersey salt. It was also built for a fresh slab of flounder fillet, breaded or battered and flash fried. We always liked ours served with a perfectly ripe Jersey tomato and a hard deli roll, with lemon and tartar sauce on the side. Be sure to be near a super chilled mug of a summer wheat beer of your choice!

Now that’s what I’m talking about…

My guess is that I now have your attention. I certainly have mine.

See you at the shore…

 

It's About Time II. A Boston Whaler Owned By Kevin McCarty, Tuckerton, New Jersey. Built for Fishing.
It’s About Time II. A 29′ Boston Whaler Owned By Kevin McCarty of Tuckerton, New Jersey
Kevin McCarty of Tuckerton, New Jersey Readies His 29' Boston Whaler For A Day of Fishing
Kevin McCarty – Ready To Roll
Boats at Rest On An Early Summer Morning At The Maritime Marina on Tuckerton Crick, New Jersey
An Early Summer Morning At The Maritime Marina on Tuckerton Crick, New Jersey
A Reminder of The Past - A Vintage Charter Boat Fishing Sign Stands Vigil Over Tuckerton Crick in New Jersey
A Reminder of The Past – A Vintage Charter Boat Sign Stands Vigil Over Tuckerton Crick
Bringing in the Mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), a Killifish, or Killies - The Best Bait Fish for Flounder
Bringing in the Mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), or Killies – The Best Bait for Flounder
The Mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), otherwise known as the Killifish, or Killie - The Best Fishing Bait for Flounder, or Fluke
A Close-up view of a Killifish, or Killie
A Fisherman Holds A Flounder, Taken Off Of The Southern New Jersey Coast Near Tuckerton, New Jersey
Looking for Lunch Off The Jersey Coast
A Fisherman Fillets A Fresh Caught Flounder Taken From The Coastal Waters of Southern New Jersey
Almost Ready For The Pan
"Fuggettoboutit!..."...New Jersey Slang for Even a Slow Day of Fishing is a Great Day On The Water
“Fuggettoboutit!…”…New Jersey Slang for Even a Slow Day of Fishing is a Great Day…
The Fish Story III, A Fishing Boat Found At Dry Dock at The Maritime Marina in Tuckerton, New Jersey
Nothing Left But A Fish Story!
“If I fished only to capture fish, my fishing trips would have ended long ago.” – Zane Grey

So That’s What A Trophy Weakfish Looks Like!, Or Ode To A Tiderunner

Rapala Floating Fish Gripper Scale Combo (Sports)


New From:$25.35 USD In Stock
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Trophy weakfish are mighty hard to come buy. This nearly 17 pound weakfish was caught by Kevin McCarty in Raritan Bay in Northern, New Jersey in 2008
Kevin McCarty of Tuckerton, New Jersey Caught This 16 pound, 12 Ounce Lunker in Raritan Bay in 2008

My brother, Kevin McCarty, has caught a lot of weakfish in his long salt water fishing career, but no others have come even close to this monster Weakie. He tells me that he neglected to weigh it for longer than he should have, and it surely weighed over 17 pounds when it first came out of the water. Add a pound or two to this guy, and you’re starting to dance around those State and World Record numbers.

It’s been many years since I left our home fishing waters near Barnegat Bay and Long Beach Island, but I have fond memories of throwing sharp-pointed, shiny things into huge schools of boiling weakfish, pinned below a clamorous sky of wheeling and diving birds.

The school was never there for very long, though we could always manage to hook up on a few fish before they disappeared below the chop. Most of the fish were in the 2-3 pound range, and I am quite sure that we never boated anything like my brother’s fish.

But that was in the early 1970’s, and I understand that things have changed quite a bit since then. From what I can gather the weakfish population has suffered a serious decline since the 1990’s. The reasons for the decline are open to debate, but no matter the cause, I am sad to hear the news.

Perhaps they may never recover their previous population counts, but there is hope. There is always hope.

It’s great to know that those marvelous mysteries of my youth have not given it all up quite yet. And if you are very, very lucky, or good, you just might hook a tiderunner weakfish like this too!

Congratulations Kevin!

See an excellent article on weakfish and weak fishing here.

https://steemit.com/fishing/@huntbook/so-that-s-what-a-trophy-weakfish-looks-like-or-ode-to-a-tiderunner