Tag Archives: Wildlife Photography

Bringing The Outside In

How I Photograph Wildlife and Nature by Leonard Lee Rue III. America's Most Published Photographer Naturalist Shares The Secrets That Lead To Superior Photographs

The Ghost Spike Of The Night

A Spike Bull Elk, Caught in The Flash Of A Game Trail Camera In Western Colorado. Photograph By Michael McCarty
A Flash In The Darkness

 

September 2018

Lots of things happen after the sun goes down, often when you have just sat for hours in a hot and dusty blind without hide nor hair of a beast with horns.

Still, there is hope in the air, all around. The elk are close, somewhere, just out of sight, but obtainable.

With luck, you may catch them soon, early in the morning, or late in the day, with enough shooting light left to seal the deal.

I hope to see you again, soon, brother elk – and don’t forget to bring along your grandfather.

Can’t wait to meet him…

Good Hunting!

By Michael Patrick McCarty

The Bighorns of The Frying Pan River

Wildlife Photographer Frank Donofrio of Glenwood Springs, Colorado caught this band of Bighorn Sheep on an island in the middle of The Frying Pan River above Basalt.

Enjoy!

 

A Bighorn Sheep Ram Crosses the Frying Pan River near Basalt, Colorado in Bighorn Sheep Unit S44
Heading For the High Country. Photo by Frank Donofrio
Photograph of a small band of bighorn sheep about to enter the Frying Pan River outside of Basalt Colorado in Bighorn Sheep Hunting Unit S44
Come On In. The Water’s Fine. Photograph by Frank Donofrio
Bighorn Sheep near Basalt, Prepare to enter the Frying Pan River in Colorado's Unit S44
MY, My That Water’s Cold! Photograph by Frank Donofrio
A Bighorn Ram crosses the Frying Pan River in northwestern Colorado in Bighorn sheep Unit S44
Just Another Day on The Frying Pan River. Photograph by Frank Donofrio
a female Bighorn sheep crosses the Frying Pan River not far from Aspen, colorado in bighorn sheep hunting unit S44
Almost There! Photograph by Frank Donofrio
A Bighorn Ram prepares to jump in the Frying Pan River near Glewnwood Springs, colorado in Unit S44
Heading In! Photograph by Frank Donofrio
A close up photo of a Male Bighorn Sheep on the Frying Pan River near Carbondale Colorado in Bighorn Sheep Unit S44
There’s Some Good Rams in Unit S44. Photograph by Frank Donofrio
  • In the past, some limited resident and nonresident licenses for archery and rifle hunting have been available by lottery in Bighorn Sheep Unit S44 of Colorado.

Posted by Michael Patrick McCarty

You May Also Like Red Rock Sentinel

https://steemit.com/hunting/@huntbook/the-bighorn-sheep-of-the-fryingpan-river

A Head Full of Bone – In Celebration of Mule Deer Bucks

 

 

A big mule deer buck feeds in the grass and willow field in the high mountains of western colorado
Photo by Michael Patrick McCarty

 

Photo by Dave Massender

 

Hope To See You Next Year. ..Photo by Michael Patrick McCarty

 

Closeup photo of a trophy mule deer buck
Photo by Michael Patrick McCarty
Sometimes You Can Find Them in Your Own Backyard

 

Sometimes You Find Them On The End of Your Arrow
Patience, Little Guy. Your Time Will Come

A Ghostly Sight in the Night

A Ghostly Light. Photo Courtesy of Greg Vitale of Carbondale, Colorado.
A Ghostly Light. Photo Courtesy of Greg Vitale of Carbondale, Colorado.

 

Watching You Watching Me - Photo Courtesy of Greg Vitale of Carbondale, Colorado
Watching You Watching Me – Photo Courtesy of Greg Vitale of Carbondale, Colorado

 

https://steemit.com/hunting/@huntbook/a-ghostly-sight-in-the-night-elk-and-mule-deer-in-the-backyard

Memories of The Giant Sea Bass, The King of The Kelp Forest

A Fishermans Catch of Giant Sea Bass By The Office Meteor Boat Company Off Catalina Island, California
The Good Old Days Never Looked So Go

 

October 7, 2015

Did you know that you may be a deltiologist?  Would your next question be, just what in the heck is that?

As it turns out, I may be one too, and I had thought that I just liked many of the images which can be found on old postcards.

Deltiology is the study and collection of postcards, and of course a deltiologist is one who collects. If you do, you are far from being alone. It is the third largest collecting hobby after stamp and coin collecting.

How about that?

I am particularly drawn to images relating to natural history and wildlife, and even more so to vintage hunting and fishing scenes.

My collection is not that big, and I don’t know all that much about the collecting field in itself. My only real motive to this point is that I bought them because I like them. I suspect that some of the images are rare. No doubt, some are not. Most are completely fascinating, at least to me.

I do know that picture postcards fall into categories based on the time period produced and published. The years 1898 to 1919 are considered to be the Golden Age of Postcards, followed by Linen Postcards (1930-1950), and the Modern Chromes (after 1940). There are further differentiations within these categories.

I found this particular postcard in a second-hand store, and I was astounded at the sheer size of the fish. My first reaction was to wonder – were they real?

Well, of course they are, and it is not an optical illusion. Photoshop and other photo manipulation programs had yet to be imagined.

But what about these magnificent fish? Could the largest of them depicted here really have weighed in at 320 pounds?

The postcard simply states “A Catch of Black Sea Bass”, and that would appear to be quite an understatement for fish of this size.  It is a species that until this time I was completely unfamiliar with, and that in itself was a big surprise. But then again, I was born and raised on the East Coast, and they are found primarily off of the coast of California, and south into Mexico.

Obviously, they would not be an easy fish to miss, though their true name is the Giant (Black) Sea Bass. To this day very little is know about their biology and habits. They may be capable of reaching lengths of up to seven or eight feet, and one specimen was reported to have weighed nearly 800 pounds. Now that’s a fish that can really get your attention, which sometimes is not such a good thing.

By 1915 both commercial and sport fisherman had taken their toll on the population. By 1935 most commercial fishing was no longer viable, and by the 1970’s they had all but disappeared. Finally, in 1981 the state of California closed all fishing for the Giant Sea Bass, although no official conservation status has ever been designated.

Postcards can be difficult to date. This one was easy, since the postmark tells us that it was posted in 1909. And we know that the charter was by the Office Meteor Boat Company, which was an established company on Catalina Island at the time. One must wonder if the participants ever had an idea that the best sport fishing years were nearly at an end?

No one knows yet if the king of the kelp forest  will ever make a full recovery, but from what I can gather there is still hope. Until then, we may have to be content with known historical reports and the photographic record, such as it is.

And that’s another great reason to collect postcards…

Posted by Michael Patrick McCarty

Read More About The Giant Sea Bass Here

https://steemit.com/fishing/@huntbook/memories-of-the-giant-sea-bass-the-king-of-the-kelp-forest

Merry Christmas To All – And A Season of Big Bucks!

 

Big Mule Deer Buck Christmas Card With Christmas Wreath and Snow in Background in Colorado
All I Want For Christmas Is A Big Mule Deer Buck. Photo Courtesy of Frank Donofrio

 

Greetings From The Colorado Rockies!

 

All the best for you and yours, and here’s to a funtastic  2019.

May you get to spend a fair amount of it in your favorite hills, haunts, and waters, wherever they may be!

 

A Mule Deer Buck Feeds Contently In the Winter Snow Of Colorado, Seen Outside the Window, With A Christmas Tree In The Foreground.
A Perfect Stocking Stuffer

 

Michael Patrick McCarty

 

You Might Also Like A Late Night Postcard

Or, A Man Made Of Meat

 

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For a Relaxing Winter Read, We Can Recommend:

 

Silence & Solitude: Yellowstone’s Winter Wilderness

 

Powerful, brutal, beautiful, and at times, enchanting, winter in Yellowstone National Park is a world unlike any other. It is a season both abstract and profound, where super-heated water erupts into arctic air, where wildlife pushes snow in a constant struggle to survive, and where silence and solitude dominate the park’s deep wilderness. Photographer Tom Murphy has experienced Yellowstone’s winter wilderness as few others have, skiing far into the backcountry with heavy camera gear, an uncanny ability to weather cold and snow, and an artist’s eye for the sublime. His photographs reveal a majestic land where the air is clean and clear and where a wolf’s throaty howl carries for miles on a still day.

“Silence & Solitude: Yellowstone’s Winter Wilderness” shows us the splendor and force of Yellowstone’s long cold. In 130 photos we begin to understand the lives of the wildlife that must endure it; we begin to feel the inspiring power of a landscape still wild and pure; and we see nature’s beauty in things great and small. These photos are accompanied by Murphy’s thoughtful words that take us into the time and place of each image. The captions allow us to smile at a fox’s serious hunt for a mouse, to understand why bison stand stoically in geothermal steam, and to marvel at a sudden shift of subtle light that brings breathtaking grandeur to a nondescript little tree and just as suddenly takes it away.

As popular author Tim Cahill observes in his foreword, “These are photos that mirror a man’s passion, and I know of nothing like them anywhere. Murphy’s photographs are not simply stunning or striking: they are also knowledgeable and even wise.”

 

Velvet And Summer Glory

Summer Is A Deer’s Best Friend

 

A trophy mule deer buck with antlers in full velvet poses in the summer grass in Colorado.
See You in Hunting Season, or Not. Photo By Brenda Bell.

The living is slow and easy in the lazy days of summer, and it’s time for rest and recovery from a long, cold winter and spring as the blood flows to a head full of antler.

They grow wide, or tall, and sometimes both. Take your pick, if you are good, and lucky, come the fall.

Meanwhile, the mule deer bucks grow ever bigger in Colorado…

 

A wide framed, trophy class mule deer buck stands in the brush in the late afternoon sun in the mountains of western colorado.
One of The Smallest Bucks in a Bachelor Group, But The Only One To Pose…Photo by Ray Seelbinder.

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Posted by Michael Patrick McCarty